A Lifetime of Disney Adventures – Disney Legend, Tom Nabbe (Part 2)

The Story So Far: Tom Nabbe started his Disney career at the age of twelve shilling newspapers on Main Street in Disneyland. A year later, after bugging Walt Disney like only a twelve-year-old can do, he was hired to be the Tom in Tom Sawyer Island. Taking pictures, signing autographs, and baiting fishing lines with worms. (Read Part 1 of the interview HERE.)

But his story doesn’t stop there. In fact Tom Nabbe’s Disney career is one of the most enviable and storied in the history of the Walt Disney Company.

In this second part of Tom Nabbe’s story, we meet him as a teenager. He leaves Tom Sawyer Island and begins working Rides and Attractions throughout the park. After an unforeseen tragedy cuts his military career short, he ships off to Orlando to help open the Magic Kingdom in Walt Disney World. After an incredible string of historic attraction openings (you won’t believe his list), Tom is called to serve on the opening crew of EPCOT Center.

As if that weren’t enough Tom was honored with a window on Main Street AND received the moniker of Disney Legend. “Legend” doesn’t begin to describe this journey.

As the interview continues, I slip in that I worked at the park for a while as a Jungle Cruise Skipper under Dick Nunis.

Tom Nabbe – Oh, okay. Well, I was a Jungle Cruise Operator back in winter ‘61/62 through ‘65 and then I left to go to the Marine Corps and then I came back. I worked, depending on what seniority bought me, I probably worked a few times on the Jungle Cruise in ‘68/‘69, and then I was promoted into management in 1970.

Freddy Martin – Wow! I did not know that about you. A fellow Skipper on the phone! That’s Fantastic. How long were you in rides and attractions

The 55 Club

T – Rides and attractions for 25 years, and the the last 22 years was in support and warehousing. So 47 years total the way the company counts it. But I count it 48, because they don’t give me credit for the year that I worked for the lessee (selling the Disneyland News in 1955).

F – But you have a paycheck stub somewhere that says 55 on it, right?

T – No. I have my original hire status from 1956. Does Ron Heminger mean anything to you?

Disneyland 1955 alumni Tom Nabbe, Bob Penfield, Dick Nunis, Ron Heminger, Ray VanDeWarker
Club 55: Tom Nabbe, Bob Penfield, Dick Nunis, Ron Heminger, Ray VanDeWarker, all men who started working at Disneyland in 1955, celebrating the park’s 40th anniversary in Walt Disney’s Apartment above the Fire Station on Main Street USA. Photo courtesy the collection of Tom Nabbe. ©2018 Tom Nabbe, all rights reserved.

Ron and myself always contested with Dick that we were both there in the beginning and that we should be members of the 55 club. And when Ron Heminger’s dad passed away… he was going through the paperwork. He found his hire status from 1955. So Ron Heminger, Myself, and a guy by the name of Marshall Spelzer (sp) that worked in decorating, all had the same hire date; June 18, 1956.

“He didn’t change my hire date, but he did recognize that I was an honorary member of the 55 Club.”

Dick had always told us that if we could prove we were there in ‘55 and worked for the company, he’d make us members of the 55 Club. So when Ron found his paperwork, Dick followed up on his promise and changed Ron’s status to whenever the date was on his paperwork was in July of ‘55, I believe. And at the same time he gave me credit to be a member of the 55 Club. He didn’t change my hire date, but he did recognize that I was an honorary member of the 55 Club.

The Battle of Pacific Coast Highway

F – Let’s transition into your career at Disney World, you already had a ton of roles and it sounds like you went off to serve in our country’s service for a while?

Disney Legend Tom Nabbe in his US Marine Corps uniform circa 1964
US Marine, Tom Nabbe circa 1965 before his “Battle of Pacific Coast Highway.” Photo courtesy the collection of Tom Nabbe. ©2018 Tom Nabbe, all rights reserved.

T – In ‘64, I got a letter from my other uncle, Uncle Sam. And Uncle Sam sent me this letter that he wanted me to participate in Vietnam. And I decided then, I’m sort of a John Wayne fan, if I was gonna go to Vietnam, I wanted to be best trained. And as far as I’m concerned that was being trained by the Marine Corps. So I went down and I enlisted in the Marine Corps.

And I enlisted on a 3-year hitch. And the reason I did that is because a 3-year hitch basically said I had no active reserve time. So it was 3 years active duty, 3 years inactive duty to satisfy the 6-year obligation. And the reason-being is the schedulers didn’t really like the “weekend warriors.”

“I always call it my “Battle at Pacific Coast Highway,” but the drunk hit me head on on Pacific Coast Highway and put me in Long Beach Hospital for 5 months. He tried to kill me, but didn’t succeed.”

If those people that signed up in the reserve or ended up getting drafted, they were “active reserve” (for) 2 years. So they had to play soldier one weekend a month and one week out of the summer. And I didn’t want that obligation. I just wanted to do my active duty time and the inactive reserve portion of it.

What I didn’t realize is that by signing up on that 3-year hitch, that I was in turn eligible for school. I scored extremely high in electronics. They decided to make an aviation radio repair man out of me. And the incentive to graduate from that was that if you failed being a radio repairman they made a radio operator out of you.

A radio operator’s life expectancy was just slightly longer than the first lieutenant of the platoon. So you didn’t want to be a radio operator. I graduated fourth in my class. And I ended up (with) orders for Da Nang.

And I guess someone up there was looking out for me… because I was hauling all my stuff back up to – my mother lived in Newport Beach – and I was hauling my stuff up to her apartment because I had orders to Da Nang. And a drunk hit me head on.

I always call it my “Battle at Pacific Coast Highway,” but the drunk hit me head on on Pacific Coast Highway and put me in Long Beach Hospital for 5 months. He tried to kill me, but didn’t succeed.

Then after that, I ended up getting mustered out on a medical. So I joined the Marine Corps in the height of the Vietnam War. I never got more than 82 miles from home, and I didn’t have to go to Vietnam.

F – What a story!

Joining The Florida Project

T – Then, when I came back I had dreams of grandeur going to Cal State Fullerton to become an electronical engineer. And I went to school on the G.I. Bill. Tried that for almost a year.

Right about that time frame they were interviewing people to come to Walt Disney World. And so I went through a round of interviews, getting promoted into management. I sort of realized I wasn’t going to be a fantastic electronical engineer, and what I really wanted to be was a rides and attractions supervisor. So I ended up taking a job offer.

I hadn’t been east of Phoenix, that I was aware of. My mother told me that we went to Chicago on a train one time, but I don’t remember that.

So, I ended up getting married in ‘68, while I was still in the Marine Corps to a lady – we worked together at Oaks Tavern (The Stage Door Café today) in Frontierland, and she was (also) working for the Anaheim School District. We ended up getting married and relocating to Florida, in January of 1971.

Monorails, Steam Trains, and Back to the Island

Two of the attractions I had never worked as a ride operator was the steam train and the monorail. And you probably know why, is they were operated by Retlaw. And in order to be a monorail operator you had to be six-foot tall, and I was never gonna be six-foot tall.

The monorail system opened in 1971 with two routes and with Mark IV monorail trains, expanded to three lines in 1982, and switched to Mark VI trains in 1989.
View showing monorail near Disney’s Contemporary Resort hotel at the Magic Kingdom in Orlando, Florida by State Library and Archives of Florida under no known copyright restrictions.

Pete Crimmings was my manager for years and one of my mentors. Pete was going to be the manager of the transportation system of Walt Disney World. And he wanted me to operate and run the Monorail system. So when I got back from the service and got promoted, I ended up getting trained on the Monorail and the Steam Trains by Retlaw. So I finally got to work those two attractions, which is sort of neat.

“Very few people on the east coast, and that’s why the New York World’s Fair (1964) was a gigantic testing ground to see how Disney attractions go over on the East Coast.”

F – You were there early on in Florida. What was it like to see Walt Disney’s Dream go to that next level? You’d been there at the beginning of the other park.

T – It was phenomenal. The people of Florida, if you look at the demographics of the people who were going to Disneyland during that time frame, only about 13 percent of the people came from east of the Mississippi. Very few people on the east coast, and that’s why the New York World’s Fair (1964) was a gigantic testing ground to see how Disney attractions go over on the East Coast.

And all the attractions at the fair were the most popular ones. So in turn, that’s how he ended up in Florida.

“Tower of the Four Winds, 1964 New York World's Fair” by Dada1960 is licensed under CC by 4.0.
Tower of the Four Winds, 1964 New York World’s Fair” by Dada1960 is licensed under CC by 4.0.

And Bob Matheison was the director at that time frame and Bob had run the Small World attraction at the New York world’s fair. And when he came back he was assigned to the Florida Project by Walt.

“So after opening the Monorail system, they decided that they were gonna build Tom Sawyer’s Island. I had a little expertise in that area…”

The neat thing of that was to see things in the conceptual stage and to actually see them constructed and to know that you’re going to operate them and actually transport guests, in whatever it was you were looking at; Monorails, Osceolas (the double-deck, side-paddle wheel, walking-beam steam boats that operated on Bay Lake and the Seven Seas Lagoon, “The Ports-O-Call” & “Southern Seas”), Mark Twains, except it was the Admiral Fowler. That’s what the original boat was (called) on the Rivers of America.

So after opening the Monorail system, they decided that they were gonna build Tom Sawyer’s Island. I had a little expertise in that area, so I went from the transportation system operating the monorail to Frontierland/Liberty Square for the construction of the Richard F. Irvine, which was the second sternwheeler, and Tom Sawyer’s Island.

And we did the same thing there. We invited the winners of the Hannibal contest there to participate in the opening of the island, and that was in, I wanna say June of ‘73,

Spaceships, Submarines, and Wild Mine Train

T – And then right after that, I ended up going to Tomorrowland because they were gonna build Space Mountain, the Star Jets, WedWay, Carousel of Progress, and Space Mountains. So I got tagged as a sort of nuts and bolts project guy so in turn I would go to where we were gonna build something new, and then go through the training of the people, and then actually operate it after that.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea attraction at Walt Disney World, Bay Lake, Florida, circa 1979. Photo by Alex Reinhart
“20,000 Leagues Under the Sea attraction circa 1979” by Alex Reinhart is licensed under CC by 3.0.

Then after we opened Space Mountain the decision was to when we opened Walt Disney World, 20k, the submarine ride, the water for the submarine ride was pumped out of the aquifer into the submarine ride, and from there it went into the moat, and from the moat it went into the Jungle Cruise, and from the jungle cruise it went to the rivers of america and then from rivers of America, it went down the light boat channel into the seven seas lagoon.

All the art directors that came down here in the beginning would go to silver springs,

“…the divers every morning had to go down and scrub the portholes of the submarines and scrub the fish and scrub the mermaids…”

And were just amazed at the clarity of the water at silver springs, and so they decided that we would get the water out of the aquifer that they wouldn’t have to chlorinate it and filter it like they had to do at Disneyland at the subs.

But in turn that wasn’t a good decision because you weren’t moving the same quantity of water through the system that was coming out of silver springs. So it started getting algae built up. And so the divers every morning had to go down and scrub the portholes of the submarines and scrub the fish and scrub the mermaids, and so the decision was to enclose 20k, and go through an entire rehab, and update everything. And we had to close it and chlorinate it.

So I went to Fantasyland to oversee that project and retrain all the sub operators and we came back up.

And once we finished that, the next thing on the horizon was Big Thunder Mountain and so I went back to Frontierland/Liberty Square for the construction of Big Thunder Mountain.

And once we opened Big Thunder Mountain, the next thing on the horizon was Epcot.

Seeing Walt’s Dream Through

And so I was moved onto the project team for Epcot into PICO. PICO’s an acronym for Project installation coordination office. And Orlando Ferrante, the Vice President of WED, actually a football player with Dick and Ron Miller, and Tommy Walker back in the good old days.

Spaceship Earth under construction in Epcot Center circa 1982, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, Walt Disney World
Spaceship Earth Construction” by BestofWDW  is licensed under CC 2.0.

Ferrante pretty much established P.I.C.O. when they built the New York World’s Fair. And had developed that whole process, and what it was to take the people out of the operating side of the business, to be involved in construction, and once the construction was over with to be involved in the training of the people to operate the new ride and attractions, and then to be part of the management group going forward. So that was sort of the evolution of PICO.

I thought I was going to be a pavilion coordinator, but my boss at that time, Norm Doerges, decided that they wanted to develop an item tracking system for everything that we bought or built for show installation and we needed a warehouse in order to do that for that product that was gonna be stored prior to installation. Some of the product was delivered directly to the site and installed and so I ran that operation. That’s how I got into warehousing.

“The manager of distribution went on vacation at Christmas time of ‘84 and he didn’t come back. I don’t know if it was an alien abduction or what…”

F – And that’s where you were for the next 22 years?

T – Yes. Actually ‘79 through 2003.

So in ‘84, when the company went through the entire restructure and went through the greenmail all that other stuff that was going on during that time, and I don’t know if you’ve read The Storming of the Magic Kingdom, but all that was going on and I end up having the opportunity to go into Distribution Services for Walt Disney World versus being in rides and attractions at Walt Disney World, so I ended up going into the warehouse operation as the superintendent of general supplies and long term project storage.

The manager of distribution went on vacation at Christmas time of ‘84 and he didn’t come back. I don’t know if it was an alien abduction or what, but he didn’t come back and six of us interviewed for the job and I ended up getting it.

That’s how I ended up being the manager of distribution services for Walt Disney World.

And Everything Else

F – What didn’t you do in the parks?

T – I was in food in ‘65 just prior to going into the Marine Corps. When all the lessees contracts started to run out, most of them were on 5 or 10 year contracts. And ABC owned United Paramount Theaters, UPT, which ran all the fast food operations at Disneyland. In ‘65, their contract was up and Disneyland Incorporated took over the fast food operations. And I worked as the Assistant Supervisor in Frontierland outdoor foods in the Oaks Tavern area.

It’s A Small Team After All: Tom Nabbe (far left) along with other Walt Disney World managers on duty for the Cast Member Christmas Party, 1975. Photo courtesy the collection of Tom Nabbe. ©2018 Tom Nabbe, all rights reserved.

And then at that point then I went into the marine corps, and when I came back, I came back into rides and attractions.

Then in ‘79, after we opened Big Thunder, I worked in Area 3 food in Walt Disney World. And that was back when they were talking about Generalists. They wanted people with backgrounds in rides and attractions, and merchandise, and food. And so I had gone in and talked to Bob Matheison about getting some food experience.

And I ended up being the food manager in what they called Area 3 Food, which was Frontierland/Liberty Square and Adventureland. And I had that for just a little less than a year until I got the job offer to go to Epcot.

The only thing I haven’t done is actually operate a merchandise location, but I was in charge of all the warehousing to support merchandise, so one of my warehouse managers used to call me a merchant wannabe.

F – I would take issue with that. I mean you sold newspapers in 1955. That’s merch, right?

T – Oh yeah. Ok. Yes, I had merchandise in 1955 as a newspaper boy.

Great Moments With Mr. Nabbe

F – I know you got Disney Legend status but did you get any other honors along the way?

Main Street USA window honoring Disney Legend Tom Nabbe at Magic Kingdom in Walt Disney World
A Window On Main Street: Tom Nabbe’s window tribute is located above the Main Street Cinema in the Magic Kingdom. Photo Courtesy Sarah Brookhart of TheBrookhartProject. ©2018 Sarah Brookhart, all rights reserved.

T – Well, I ended up with a window on main street when I retired in 03 at Walt Disney World. I tried for both parks but I didn’t make it. But they did give me a window on Main Street. It’s above the cinema on the right hand side. And the window says Sawyer Fence Painting, Proprietor, Tom Nabbe, Lake Buena Vista, Florida and Anaheim, California.

 

Tom Nabbe’s Window on Main Street USA at Magic Kingdom in Walt Disney World, Florida
Tom Nabbe’s Window on Main Street: “Sawyer Fence Painting Co. Tom Nabbe, Proprietor, Anaheim, California, Lake Buena Vista Florida” Photo Courtesy Sarah Brookhart of TheBrookhartProject. ©2018 Sarah Brookhart, all rights reserved.

F – What were some of your greatest moments in your Disney career.

T – Every 5th anniversary for Disneyland, with the exception of the 10th cause I was gone then in the Marine Corps, my goal is to be on Main Street on July 17, and I’ve managed to accomplish that ever since 1970.

And when we were out there for Disneyland’s 50th anniversary, the alumni club out there had a dinner dance, and we had gone to the dance, and while we were at the dance, Jim Cora (James Cora), does that name mean anything to you? Well Jim sorta looked at me and said, “Well, Tom, I’ll see you in September.” And I don’t know if you ever worked with Jim, but Jim was one of those guys that if he could pull your leg, and throw something out there, he’s always looking to razz you, and so I’m sort of a little curious here, but I says, well, no I won’t be back in September.

He says “We’ve been nominated and going to be inducted as Disney Legends.” I thought, “Well that’s sorta neat.”

Partners and Legends: Tom Nabbe with his Disney Legends award at the Legends Plaza at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California. Statues “Partners” and “Legends” by Disney sculptor, Blaine Gibson.
Partners and Legends: Tom Nabbe with his Disney Legends award at the Legends Plaza at Walt Disney Studios in Burbank. Photo courtesy the collection of Tom Nabbe. ©2018 Tom Nabbe, all rights reserved.

So when we got back to the hotel room after dinner, I had called my sister who was house sitting for me, and said, “hey is there a letter from the studio there.” And she said, “oh yeah.” I said, “How about opening it up and looking at it?” And sure enough it said that we were invited back in September of 05 to be inducted as a Disney Legend, and so Cora wasn’t pulling my leg. It was an actual event that was occurring.

So we were able to come back out and they treated us like royalty. Because of the anniversary, they normally had the ceremonies at that time frame at the studio. Because of Disneyland’s 50th, they had it at Disneyland, which was sort of neat.

F – Where did that take place? At the Hub?

T – Opera House. We had lunch at a restaurant there at Downtown Disney, the Napa Rose restaurant. And I had the opportunity to have lunch with Roy Disney at that lunch. The Legends program was very much Roy’s baby. Sorta neat.

Roy E. Disney with Tom Nabbe at his Disney Legend induction dinner held at the Napa Rose in The Grand Californian Hotel. Note Disney Imagineering Legend, X. Atencio
Roy E. Disney with Tom Nabbe at his Disney Legend induction dinner held at the Napa Rose in The Grand Californian Hotel. Note Disney Imagineering Legend, X. Atencio looking on. Photo courtesy the collection of Tom Nabbe. ©2018 Tom Nabbe, all rights reserved.

Plus Roy’s a sailor and I’m a sailor. The only difference is my boat is 16 foot and his boat is 60 feet, but sailing is sailing so we were both able to talk a little bit about sailing. He had just finished up on the Honolulu race.

NEXT: We’ll go back again to Disneyland on July 17, 1955, when a celebrity makes Tom Nabbe’s dreams come true with a couple passes to the fateful Press Opening. You won’t want to miss one magical moment with Disney Legend, Tom Nabbe. 

Cover of From Tom Sawyer to Disney Legend - The Adventures of Tom Nabbe by Tom Nabbe
From Tom Sawyer to Disney Legend – The Adventures of Tom Nabbe

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Read Tom Nabbe’s auto-biography, From Tom Sawyer to Disney Legend – The Adventures of Tom Nabbe available at TomNabbe.com (autographed and personalized) or on Amazon.

To learn more about Walt Disney’s affinity for Mark Twain and a mysterious mark inside a cave on Tom Sawyer Island at the Magic Kingdom in Florida, check out “The Hand of Walt – A Disney Secret Hidden For Decades Is Finally Revealed!”

 

Did you miss Part 1? The story of how Tom Nabbe became Walt Disney’s own Tom Sawyer is the kind of magic every Disney fan dreams of. Read it HERE.

Disneyland Finally Gets Its Own S.E.A. Connection… and the Mysterious Photo That Will Blow You Out of the Backside of Water!

The newly opened Bengal BBQ dining area at Disneyland features a bevy of curious Easter eggs which appear to reveal a richly hewn backstory that ties Disneyland’s Adventureland to Disney parks around the world through a mysterious club known as “The S.E.A.”

Disney parks are known for their incredible spacial storytelling techniques. They weave together seemingly unrelated details and hidden nuggets within the architecture and decor to tell cohesive stories that the sharp-eyed visitor can see and enjoy. It’s what makes it possible to visit the parks again and again for a lifetime without the novelty wearing off.

One such storyline revolves, not around a famous Disney film property, but around a secret society of wealthy globetrotters and treasure seekers known as the Society of Explorers and Adventurers (The S.E.A.). It’s origins are mysterious even among Disney insiders. That’s because details revealed about these fez-wearing, secret handshake-shaking millionaires are few and far between. Only in recent years has some of the folklore been added through hidden details and, in a few cases, overt placement in attractions, stores, and dining locations.

Do a quick web search for S.E.A. members and their back stories to get caught up (not to be confused with the Sea Org of Scientology fame). Here’s a couple posts from Disney Wikia and Attractions Magazine that were helpful for me. Then come back here to find out about the latest S.E.A. discovery, which is so full of story, I’m sure it will knock your jungle boots clean off! Go ahead. I’ll wait.

Great! You’re back. Now check this out.

The Bengal BBQ dining area is a set of rooms that used to be a retail location called Adventurers Outpost. The shop was emptied out to make space to get diners out of the way of a very congested section of Adventureland walkways. This change allowed Disney Imagineers and opportunity to do a little tweaking to the decor and hide a few fun secrets in plain sight.

A shelf of treasures and secrets.

When you first walk into the Bengal BBQ dining area, turn left and look up. There’s a line of shelves with various themed items on display. There’s a box full of correspondence from a bygone era – handwritten letters and postcards with stamps on them! Go figure. Hidden among the letters is a photograph of a quirky looking character wearing an old-timey pilot’s cap and goggles. This chap, it turns out, is Professor R. Blauerhimmel – a member of the S.E.A. We know this because his framed portrait hangs in a gallery within Mystic Manor, the Haunted Mansion related attraction at Hong Kong Disneyland. Incidentally, “Blauerhimmel” is German for Blue Sky, which not only hints as the good Professor’s chief domain as a pilot of some sort, but also a nod to the term Imagineers use for brainstorming new ideas.

Photo of Professor R. Blauerhimmel (Blue Sky in German)

(Please use the following information for good, not for evil.) I reached up to touch the letters in the box and unlike most Disney theming, they were loose. That’s how I got these close up photos of the letters inside. Cursory web searches did not reveal much about the names on these papers, although both Elizabeth Doer and Bessie Steele searches both uncovered some other fun adventure related sites I’m sure I’ll dig in to sometime in the future. Never fear, I put the cards back exactly as I found them.

Mail call, Mrs. Doer.

 

Get well, Miss Steele.

 

From and from. Some message. Glad I stood by the postbox waiting.

Next to the box is a black case, presumably for binoculars, with a brass latch emblazoned with the letters E-I-T-C. Although the arrangement of the letters doesn’t match the various logos used by the East India Trading Company, those notorious letters will always bring to mind the empire-building villains of the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise. Could this be the start of an eventual tie-in between Adventureland’s jungle and Captain Jack’s New Orleans bayou? We can only wait and see. 

Correction: This is not an E.I.T.C. binoculars case. It’s a film camera case from the Eastman Kodak Company. Thanks for the help, dear readers.

(Update: Awesome readers like you have cleared up this particular mystery for us. This is not in fact a version of the E.I.T.C. logo for pirates story purposes. The initials are actually EKC, which stands for Eastman Kodak Company, the longtime photographic sponsor of Disneyland since park opening in 1955. Don’t believe me? Watch.)

Keep moving around the room to the right until you reach another cluster of explorer bric-a-brac. Hanging on the wall is a famous portrait of the S.E.A.’s founding members dated 1899. This same portrait appears in various Disney park locations worldwide. The photo features several key characters involved in this ever evolving story line.

From left: Harrison Hightower III, Professor Blauerhimmel, Albert, Lord Henry Mystic, Dr. J.L. Baterista, Barnabas T. Bullion?, unknown member, Captain Mary Oceaneer, and another unknown member.

From left to right we see Harrison Hightower III (accused grave robber and owner of the Hightower Hotel, the Tower of Terror in Tokyo Disney Sea), Professor Blauerhimmel (back story unknown), Lord Henry Mystic (curiosity collector and master of Mystic Manor), Dr. J.L. Baterista (back story unknown – name means “drummer”), an unknown gentleman (possibly Barnabas T. Bullion, the gold-mad owner of the Big Thunder Mining Company), another unknown gentleman (his cold weather clothing may link him to the Matterhorn or Expedition Everest), Captain Mary Oceaneer (featured on Disney Cruise Line’s Oceaneer Labs and Miss Adventure Falls, the new rafting adventure at Typhoon Lagoon), and one last unknown gentleman (possibly linked to Frontierland based on his outfit).

Lord Mystic and his monkey, Albert.

Now glance back to the seated Lord Henry Mystic. If you didn’t notice before, nested on his shoulder is an innocent-looking monkey named Albert. This cute little fellow is Lord Mystic’s faithful pet who’s curiosity and mischief sets in motion the adventures that befall visitors to Mystic Manor. Albert’s naive troublemaking is akin to Abu’s from Aladdin or Mickey’s from the Sorcerer’s Apprentice. A little bit of his curiosity sets off a whole mess of trouble.

So why are all these S.E.A. references hidden here in the diner across from the World Famous Jungle Cruise?

To answer that, we need to bounce briefly across the continent to Walt Disney World in Florida to the newest restaurant in Magic Kingdom’s Adventureland. Opened in late 2015, the “Jungle Navigation Co. Ltd. Skipper Canteen” expanded the S.E.A. lore to include an elaborate backstory focused around the World Famous Jungle Cruise and it’s world famous Skippers. The Skipper Canteen (for short) is an interactive, comedy restaurant experience where the infamous jungle boat Captains come ashore to serve your food with loads of laughs, a helping of humor, and a side of sarcasm. It is definitely the new must-do, immersive dining experience at the parks.

Getting jungle mad with Skipper Emma in February 2016.

The restaurant is themed as the headquarters of the Jungle Navigation Co. Ltd., the company that hires out boats to take tourists on dark water safari through the rain forest. According to story, the canteen is the mess hall where the Skippers might come for a little R & R between their long river journeys. The company was established by Dr. Albert Falls, the personification of one of the jungle attraction’s most famous jokes.

The guardian’s of Professor Marley’s back side… of water.

 

Hand painted portrait of that noted explorer, Dr. Albert Falls.

A portrait of Dr. Falls, skippering a boat in front of the waterfall that bears his name, hangs in the Canteen’s entryway. The company is now under the management of Dr. Falls’ granddaughter, Alberta Falls, who took over when the good doctor allegedly met an untimely and mysterious end.

Tiki bird glass lamps in the Falls Family dining room.

But the Skipper Canteen is not just a cafeteria for hungry river guides. There are two other dining areas that help to fill out the story, each filled with details and references to the attraction that will keep you laughing throughout your meal. The first is the Falls family dining room. Decorated with all the comforts of home away from home, this elegant room is where Dr. Falls’ family would have dined separately from their wise-cracking employees.

Sample of some of the laughter-inducing titles in the Skipper Canteen bookcase.

The second room, however is more mysterious. Hidden behind a revolving bookcase (you’ll stand for an hour reading the hilarious, pun-filled book titles), is a secret S.E.A. dining and meeting room. Adorned with artifacts and collections culled from exotic locales by club members, this room is the most elegant (and enigmatic) of them all – and it confirms that Dr. Albert Falls was a card carrying member of Society of Explorers and Adventurers.

From the collection of the S.E.A.

 

The S.E.A. Crest

Now, let’s get back to Disneyland.

With the Jungle Cruise now established as being owned by the dead or missing Dr. Albert Falls and his confirmed membership in the S.E.A., it’s now obvious that the Bengal BBQ dining area has a similar story background as the Skipper Canteen. Clearly the S.E.A. references here are meant to communicate that this too is another of Dr. Falls’ outposts in the jungle. And it’s with this knowledge that we uncover what I believe to be one of the most amazing assemblies of Disney Easter eggs ever collected in one tiny place.

Bengal BBQ at Disneyland: Katharine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart in a still from The African Queen… or perhaps there’s something more to this mysterious photo.

Further along the wall to the left of the S.E.A. portrait, almost hidden in a dark corner is a curious framed photo of some familiar faces. At first glance, you’ll recognize the famous faces of Katharine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart. The photo appears to be a still from the 1951 film, The African Queen, for which Bogart won an Oscar.

Katharine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart travel down a jungle river.

According to Disney lore, even though it was not a Disney picture, The African Queen was the inspiration for the Jungle Cruise attraction. Over the years, some have said that the ride was inspired by Disney’s true-life adventure series, and to some degree that’s probably true, but there’s plenty of evidence that Walt took most of the ride’s motif (the canopied boat, the “signs of danger,” the attacking natives, the rapids, and the wise cracking captain) from the United Artists film.

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn aboard the Jungle Cruise’s Zambezi Miss

Now look a little closer at the photo. Above Hepburn’s and Bogart’s heads you’ll see part of a curved sign that states the name of the boat they’re in. The full name isn’t visible, but it’s obvious it reads “Zambezi Miss,” one of the dozen or so boat names used on Adventureland’s rivers. This photo, placed within yards of the attraction seems to be an official Disney nod to the true origin of the ride that should finally put the question of its inspiration to rest.

Albert the monkey from Mystic Manor accompany’s Katharine Hepburn in The African Queen

But wait. That’s not all that’s hiding in this story-filled photo. There is a stow-away on this romantic river excursion. Seated on the bench next to Kate is none other than Albert the monkey, Lord Mystic’s adored pet. That’s right. The trouble-making simian from Hong Kong Disneyland’s Mystic Manor appears to have been rescued by the movie stars. He is clearly the reason they both appear so perplexed and worn out. I believe the monkey had been separated somehow from his master and Hepburn and Bogart – driven bananas by his hijinks (sorry) – are on a mission to rid themselves of his monkey business once and for all.

If that’s the case, then why did they bring the monkey so deep into the jungle? Why not drop him off at the nearest zoo? Or snapping ginger? The answer to this question lies in the photograph on the crate in front of them. You didn’t see that at first, did you? Stick with me. It gets even better.

In search of Dr. Albert Falls

Tilt your head 45 degrees to the right, and you’ll see that the photo is of the portrait of none other than… Dr. Albert Falls!

Are you ready for this? Katharine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart are searching for Dr. Albert Falls, a member of the S.E.A., because they believe he alone can locate another S.E.A. member, Lord Mystic, so that they may finally return to him his cursed monkey – and with any luck, be accepted as honored members of the S.E.A. themselves!

Unfortunately for the screen legends, there’s a problem they hadn’t considered. Sadly, Dr. Falls is no longer with us. If I read the hints at Skipper Canteen correctly, Dr. Falls, ever the adventurer, motored off into the jungle one green morning and never returned. Like many a cruise before him (and since), his doomed safari never checked in at the outposts. His granddaughter Alberta has presumed him dead ever since.

Hold up there, Skipper. There’s one more clue you might have missed. Don’t feel bad. Hepburn and Bogart missed it too.

Is the explorer at the top of the trapped safari none other than the noted explorer Dr. Albert Falls? Humphrey Bogart may have something to say about that.

Just over Bogie’s left shoulder we are given a glimpse into the untimely fate of Dr. Falls and his lost safari. Treed by an unhappy rhino, it appears that our pith-helmeted hero, the intrepid explorer, the consummate adventurer, the keeper of the keys to the S.E.A.’s secret lair, will finally get the point in…

The End.

(Portions of this tale were originally revealed in comments on an article about S.E.A. references in Disney parks here: http://www.themeparktourist.com/features/20140621/18738/10-disney-rides-connected-secret-society)

 

Your Adventure

Have you visited the Bengal Barbecue since the remodel? Send photographic proof that you’ve seen evidence of the S.E.A. at Disneyland to TheFredMartin@gmail.com. I’ll send one of my first Skipper Freddy adventure badges to the first 10 people to respond. Follow me on Instagram @SkipperFreddy for new Disney secrets and updates as they happen.